Billboard Values

I recently visited my daughter, Shannon, and her son, Trey.  In the days leading up to my trip, Trey kept telling me how excited he was to show me something they made for the house.  When I got there, he led me to their dining room where they had posted a list on their dining room wall in large bold letters.  I’ve seen lists in people’s houses before…grocery lists, to do lists, a list of chores with gold stars next to them.  But this was nothing like those.  This was like nothing  I‘d ever seen before.  On their wall, posted for everyone to see, is a list of their family values.   

Shannon and Trey developed their creed together.  It begins, “In this home…” telling the world that these are the rules by which these people are going to live.  The shiny black lettered words are in direct contrast to the pale yellow-painted walls, catching the attention of everyone who enters the front door.  Each word and phrase is meticulously lined up.  No one can ignore them.  The list reads as follows:

“ In this home…

We do second chances.

We do grace.

We do real.

We do mistakes.

We do I’m sorrys.

We do family.

We do love.”

The details of this creed say a lot about my daughter.  You could break down each individually, and I have, and what each one means.  I liked that she recognized each singularly.  And together, all these values add up to my being overly proud of the woman that she has become.  But I will leave that for another conversation, one just between Shannon and me.

 For now I want to focus on other aspects of this list.  Think about how clear your values must be to post them on your wall for everyone to see.  Think of how aligned you must be with those values to post them on your wall.  Think of how conscious you must be that even the most dedicated can slip up, and that we can all use another reminder. 

The posting of one’s values is quite different than just having them in one’s mind.  By posting your values, you hold yourself accountable to a level of behavior that exemplifies how you wish to live.  Most likely, if you are reading this, you are an adult.  And you’re not really accountable to anyone in terms of going further in life:   In terms of reaching your potential, in terms of stretching yourself, or of living a life that agrees with your values.  These billboard values make you accountable. 

 Women with high successtrogen levels have values that dictate their behavior.  They live them day to day, moment by moment.  Whether it is written or not, they have a personal value set that underlines all that they say and do. 

What does your personal creed look like?  Have you taken the time to contemplate it?  To write it down?  Would you post it on your wall?

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3 responses to “Billboard Values

  1. Pam Gillette Frye

    Love this post. “We are what we repeatedly do.” Reading this blog is now one of my habits. So being real becomes not uncomfortable or based on fear of others expectations. It becomes natural. I don’t know how to be anything but. My day today was “real.” Trey is wise beyond his years.

  2. You compliment your daughter for her insight in posting these lists…I compliment you , her mother for instilling the values and being this example she could follow and pass down to her children. The greatest compliment I received was from my own dauhters’ who said ” I hope I (we) can be as good a mother to my (our) children as you have been to me (us)”…and you know, they ARE ! Interestingly enough, their husbands (and my son) are great with the kids as well !

  3. I love hearing about real fanily values! There are so many values lessons illustrated in this posting for parents, children, CEOs and politicians. Thanks for sharing, Jane

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